Guided Kayaking Excursions

In this guided tour of the Lake Worth Lagoon, students will explore the estuary ecosystem and Peanut Island. There will be lots of opportunities to see unique wildlife from your kayak. Program content can be aligned to state standards upon request.

Public schools: $550 for a four-hour experience, $26/student with 25 students

Private reservation: $650

Mobile Marine Lab at your school

Let us bring our little slice of the ocean to you! Your students will get a thrill with our custom-made trailer, complete with a touch tank, a watershed table and an augmented reality topography sandbox. Each of these displays teaches valuable lessons about Florida’s local ecosystems. Please reach out to us for state standards information.

Title I: $850 for a five-hour experience, $5.60/student with 150 students

Public: $950 for a five-hour experience, $6.40/student with 150 students

Private reservation: $1050 for a five-hour experience

Mini Marine Lab at your site

Our mini marine lab program is made specifically for our smallest marine scientists, children ages 2 to 5. During this 5-session program, students will participate in science discovery activities paired with a picture book. Each session, we will bring an animal visitor from our touch tank.

Session Themes Include:

Ocean Commotion: Introduction to World Oceans, What’s Afloat in the Ocean? Introduction to Buoyancy, Animal Adaptations: Shark Science, and Fun with Fishing.

$500 for five sessions

$150 for just one session

Marine Lab Excursions by boat

Come aboard our boat the Thea Marie, a 49-passenger Coast Guard-inspected vessel, to explore and learn about our local marine ecosystems! Find your grade level below to find our current standards-aligned program offerings.

Title I Schools: $950 for a four-hour experience, approximately $24/student with 40 students

Public Schools: $1250

Private Charter: $1450

Kindergarten & 1st Grade: Estuary Explorers

Students will practice their scientific observation skills by using their five senses while exploring the Lake Worth Lagoon by boat and hiking on Munyon Island. We will learn to fish while on Munyon Island and compare and contrast the fish that we catch.

Kindergarten

SC.K.L.14.3: Observe plants and animals, describe how they are alike and how they are different in the way they look and in the things they do.

SC.K.N.1.1: Collaborate with a partner to collect information.

SC.K.N.1.2: Make observations of the natural world and know that they are descriptors collected using the five senses.

SC.K.N.1.3: Keep records as appropriate — such as pictorial records — of investigations conducted.

SC.K.N.1.4: Observe and create a visual representation of an object which includes its major features.

1st

SC.1.L.14.1: Make observations of living things and their environment using the five senses.

SC.1.L.14.3: Differentiate between living and nonliving things.

SC.1.L.17.1: Through observation, recognize that all plants and animals, including humans, need the basic necessities of air, water, food, and space.

SC.1.N.1.1: Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them in teams through free exploration, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

SC.1.N.1.2: Using the five senses as tools, make careful observations, describe objects in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion, and compare their observations with others.

SC.1.N.1.3: Keep records as appropriate – such as pictorial and written records -of investigations conducted.

2nd & 3rd Grade: Habitat Heroes

Students will explore the different habitats the Lake Worth Lagoon has to offer while aboard the Thea Marie and on Munyon Island. While fishing and seine netting on Munyon Island, we will sort and classify all of the animals we catch while discussing their habitat and needs for survival.

2nd

SC.2.L.17.1: Compare and contrast the basic needs that all living things, including humans, have for survival.

SC.2.L.17.2: Recognize and explain that living things are found all over Earth, but each is only able to live in habitats that meet its basic needs.

SC.2.N.1.1: Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them in teams through free exploration and systematic observations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

SC.2.N.1.6: Explain how scientists alone or in groups are always investigating new ways to solve problems.

3rd

SC.3.L.15.1: Classify animals into major groups (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, arthropods, vertebrates and invertebrates, those having live births and those which lay eggs) according to their physical characteristics and behaviors.

SC.3.N.1.1: Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them individually and in teams through free exploration and systematic investigations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

SC.3.N.1.3: Keep records as appropriate, such as pictorial, written, or simple charts and graphs, of investigations conducted.

SC.3.N.1.6: Infer based on observation.

 

4th & 5th Grade: Fishing the Food Chain

Students will investigate the flow of energy through the many food chains found within our marine ecosystems. They will begin by observing one of the foundations of the food chain: plankton. We will also take a look at animals and plants we catch with a seine net and while fishing from our boat. At the end of the trip, students will work together to construct a food web of all of the organisms observed that day.

4th

SC.4.L.17.2: Explain that animals, including humans, cannot make their own food and that when animals eat plants or other animals, the energy stored in the food source is passed to them.

SC.4.L.17.3: Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.

SC.4.L.17.4: Recognize ways plants and animals, including humans, can impact the environment.

SC.4.N.1.1: Raise questions about the natural world, use appropriate reference materials that support understanding to obtain information (identifying the source), conduct both individual and team investigations through free exploration and systematic investigations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

SC.4.N.1.3: Explain that science does not always follow a rigidly defined method (“the scientific method”) but that science does involve the use of observations and empirical evidence.

SC.4.N.1.6: Keep records that describe observations made, carefully distinguishing actual observations from ideas and inferences about the observations.

5th

SC.5.L.15.1: Describe how, when the environment changes, differences between individuals allow some plants and animals to survive and reproduce while others die or move to new locations.

SC.5.L.17.1: Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.

SC.5.N.2.1: Recognize and explain that science is grounded in empirical observations that are testable; explanation must always be linked with evidence.

SC.5.N.2.2: Recognize and explain that when scientific investigations are carried out, the evidence produced by those investigations should be replicable by others.

Marine Lab Excursions

Middle School and High School: Marine Fisheries Field Studies

This program will focus on the practice and science of recreational fishing in the Lake Worth Lagoon as well as management processes concerning sustainable fisheries.

While aboard the Thea Marie students will do multiple studies to assess the health of the Lake Worth Lagoon ecosystem and fisheries. Students will practice water quality measurement and interpretation skills. We will collect and examine plankton samples as a bioindicator of ecosystem health. Students will practice their fishing skills and assess the biodiversity and the health of the lagoon fisheries by recording and measuring their catches.  The collected data will be taken back to the classroom where they will collaborate to make a final assessment of the health of the Lake Worth Lagoon ecosystem and fisheries.

6th

SC.6.L.15.1: Analyze and describe how and why organisms are classified according to shared characteristics with emphasis on the Linnaean system combined with the concept of Domains.

SC.6.N.1.4: Discuss, compare, and negotiate methods used, results obtained, and explanations among groups of students conducting the same investigation.

7th

SC.7.L.17.1: Explain and illustrate the roles of and relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in the process of energy transfer in a food web.

SC.7.L.17.2: Compare and contrast the relationships among organisms such as mutualism, predation, parasitism, competition, and commensalism.

SC.7.L.17.3: Describe and investigate various limiting factors in the local ecosystem and their impact on native populations, including food, shelter, water, space, disease, parasitism, predation, and nesting sites.

8th

SC.8.N.4.1: Explain that science is one of the processes that can be used to inform decision making at the community, state, national, and international levels.

SC.8.N.4.2: Explain how political, social, and economic concerns can affect science, and vice versa.

9th-12th

SC.912.L.17.12 : Discuss the political, social, and environmental consequences of sustainable use of land.

SC.912.L.17.2: Explain the general distribution of life in aquatic systems as a function of chemistry, geography, light, depth, salinity, and temperature.

SC.912.L.17.1: Discuss the characteristics of populations, such as number of individuals, age structure, density, and pattern of distribution.

SC.912.L.17.3: Discuss how various oceanic and freshwater processes, such as currents, tides, and waves, affect the abundance of aquatic organisms.

SC.912.L.17.8: Recognize the consequences of the losses of biodiversity due to catastrophic events, climate changes, human activity, and the introduction of invasive, non-native species.

SC.912.L.17.19: Describe how different natural resources are produced and how their rates of use and renewal limit availability.

SC.912.L.17.20: Predict the impact of individuals on environmental systems and examine how human lifestyles affect sustainability.

SS.912.C.2.3: Experience the responsibilities of citizens at the local, state, or federal levels.

SS.912.C.2.10: Monitor current public issues in Florida.

 

Kindergarten & 1st Grade: Estuary Explorers

Students will practice their scientific observation skills by using their five senses while exploring the Lake Worth Lagoon by boat and hiking on Munyon Island. We will learn to fish while on Munyon Island and compare and contrast the fish that we catch.

Kindergarten

SC.K.L.14.3: Observe plants and animals, describe how they are alike and how they are different in the way they look and in the things they do.

SC.K.N.1.1: Collaborate with a partner to collect information.

SC.K.N.1.2: Make observations of the natural world and know that they are descriptors collected using the five senses.

SC.K.N.1.3: Keep records as appropriate — such as pictorial records — of investigations conducted.

SC.K.N.1.4: Observe and create a visual representation of an object which includes its major features.

1st

SC.1.L.14.1: Make observations of living things and their environment using the five senses.

SC.1.L.14.3: Differentiate between living and nonliving things.

SC.1.L.17.1: Through observation, recognize that all plants and animals, including humans, need the basic necessities of air, water, food, and space.

SC.1.N.1.1: Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them in teams through free exploration, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

SC.1.N.1.2: Using the five senses as tools, make careful observations, describe objects in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion, and compare their observations with others.

SC.1.N.1.3: Keep records as appropriate – such as pictorial and written records -of investigations conducted.

2nd & 3rd Grade: Habitat Heroes

Students will explore the different habitats the Lake Worth Lagoon has to offer while aboard the Thea Marie and on Munyon Island. While fishing and seine netting on Munyon Island, we will sort and classify all of the animals we catch while discussing their habitat and needs for survival.

2nd

SC.2.L.17.1: Compare and contrast the basic needs that all living things, including humans, have for survival.

SC.2.L.17.2: Recognize and explain that living things are found all over Earth, but each is only able to live in habitats that meet its basic needs.

SC.2.N.1.1: Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them in teams through free exploration and systematic observations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

SC.2.N.1.6: Explain how scientists alone or in groups are always investigating new ways to solve problems.

3rd

SC.3.L.15.1: Classify animals into major groups (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, arthropods, vertebrates and invertebrates, those having live births and those which lay eggs) according to their physical characteristics and behaviors.

SC.3.N.1.1: Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them individually and in teams through free exploration and systematic investigations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

SC.3.N.1.3: Keep records as appropriate, such as pictorial, written, or simple charts and graphs, of investigations conducted.

SC.3.N.1.6: Infer based on observation.

4th & 5th Grade: Fishing the Food Chain

Students will investigate the flow of energy through the many food chains found within our marine ecosystems. They will begin by observing one of the foundations of the food chain: plankton. We will also take a look at animals and plants we catch with a seine net and while fishing from our boat. At the end of the trip, students will work together to construct a food web of all of the organisms observed that day.

4th

SC.4.L.17.2: Explain that animals, including humans, cannot make their own food and that when animals eat plants or other animals, the energy stored in the food source is passed to them.

SC.4.L.17.3: Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.

SC.4.L.17.4: Recognize ways plants and animals, including humans, can impact the environment.

SC.4.N.1.1: Raise questions about the natural world, use appropriate reference materials that support understanding to obtain information (identifying the source), conduct both individual and team investigations through free exploration and systematic investigations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

SC.4.N.1.3: Explain that science does not always follow a rigidly defined method (“the scientific method”) but that science does involve the use of observations and empirical evidence.

SC.4.N.1.6: Keep records that describe observations made, carefully distinguishing actual observations from ideas and inferences about the observations.

5th

SC.5.L.15.1: Describe how, when the environment changes, differences between individuals allow some plants and animals to survive and reproduce while others die or move to new locations.

SC.5.L.17.1: Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.

SC.5.N.2.1: Recognize and explain that science is grounded in empirical observations that are testable; explanation must always be linked with evidence.

SC.5.N.2.2: Recognize and explain that when scientific investigations are carried out, the evidence produced by those investigations should b

Custom Programming

Contact us and we can create a custom program based on your classroom curriculum!

Homeschool groups, we can design a program for your children at your site or at our site in Riviera Beach.

 

Shannon Lalime

Program Director

716-341-3248

Emily Howard

Education Director

765-413-1142

 

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